Mapping Stereotypes

Alphadesigner extremely interesting web by Yanko Tsvetkov, freelance graphic designer and a visual artist from Bulgaria. Mapping Stereotypes Project is one of the projects conducted for him.

There is Europe and there is another Europe of stereotypes. Yanko Tsvetkov has mapped some of the stereotypes that have always pervaded the Old World. Tsevtkov’s aim was to describe how the citizens of world see other countries and what was an experiment is now a runaway success with more than half a billion visitors logging on to the artist’s Mapping Stereotypes website to view the charts.

Here are some of the maps, for the rest visit the web.

Europe according to the Greeks

L’europa Berlusconiana

Europe according to the Vatican

Hitchhiker's Guide to The Arab Spring

#EUrony

New Greek Coin (I don't own this image)

 

In times of crisis humour is the best remedy. Enjoy amusing joke about EU (not mine) 🙂

European paradise: 
You are invited to an official lunch. You are welcomed by an Englishman. Food is prepared by a Frenchman and an Italian puts you in the mood and everything is organised by a German. 
European hell: 
You are invited to an official lunch. You are welcomed by a Frenchman. Food is prepared by an Englishman, German puts you in the mood but, don’t worry, everything is organised by an Italian. 
That joke was proposed by a Belgian as the Official European Joke, the joke that every single European pupil should learn at school. The Joke will improve the relationship between the nations as well as promote our self humour and our culture.
The European Council met in order to make a decision. Should the joke be the Official European Joke or not?
The British representative announced, with a very serious face and without moving his jaw, that the joke was absolutely hilarious.
The French one protested because France was depicted in a bad way in the joke. He explained that a joke cannot be funny if it is against France.
Poland also protested because they were not depicted in the joke.
Luxembourg asked who would hold the copyright on the joke. The Swedish representative didn’t say a word, but looked at everyone with a twisted smile.
Denmark asked where the explicit sexual reference was. If it is a joke, there should be one, shouldn’t there?
Holland didn’t get the joke, while Portugal didn’t understand what a “joke” was. Was it a new concept?
Spain explained that the joke is funny only if you know that the lunch was at 13h, which is normally breakfast time.
Greece complained that they were not aware of that lunch, that they missed an occasion to have some free food, that they were always forgotten.
 Romania then asked what a “lunch” was.
 Lithuania et Latvia complained that their translations were inverted, which is unacceptable even if it happens all the time.
 Slovenia told them that its own translation was completely forgotten and that they do not make a fuss.
 Slovakia announced that, unless the joke was about a little duck and a plumber, there was a mistake in their translation.
 The British representative said that the duck and plumber story seemed very funny too.
 Hungary had not finished reading the 120 pages of its own translation yet .
Then, the Belgian representative asked if the Belgian who proposed the joke was a Dutch speaking or a French speaking Belgian. Because, in one case, he would of course support a compatriot but, in the other case, he would have to refuse it, regardless of the quality of the joke.
 To close the meeting, the German representative announced that it was nice to have the debate here in Brussels but that, now, they all had to make the train to Strasbourg in order to take a decision. He asked that someone to wake up the Italian, so as not to miss the train, so they can come back to Brussels and announce the decision to the press before the end of the day .
 “What decision?” asked the Irish representative.
 And they all agreed it was time for some coffee.

Photos of the Week

source: The Economist

The euro-zone rescue package does not mean common economic government. But the rules are clearly changing..

SINCE 1949, Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty has bound NATO members to a solemn vow: an armed attack on one of the alliance shall be treated as an attack against all. With international markets closed to Greece, and contagion threatening Portugal and Spain, European Union leaders agreed to a similar pledge after a pair of gruelling, late-night meetings on May 7th and 9th.

From now on, they in effect declared, markets betting against one member of the euro zone would meet a swift response from all 16. Emergency finance would be channelled to vulnerable governments from an array of fighting funds of up to €750 billion ($950 billion) variously loaned or guaranteed by EU countries, euro-zone members and the IMF (see article).

The European Union’s policymakers were forced to act with unaccustomed speed and unprecedented force. A promised huge rescue fund and central-bank help for indebted governments have eased the euro area’s crisis. The respite must be used wisely.. (see article)

Electoral defeat at home and the euro-zone rescue package have rocked Angela Merkel’s chancellorship. She now faces some tough decisions..

MAY 9th is not a day Angela Merkel will soon forget. First voters in North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), Germany’s most populous state, booted the chancellor’s allies out of office, meting out her worst political drubbing in more than five years in office. That evening European finance ministers meeting in Brussels armed a financial bomb to deter speculators threatening the stability of the euro (see article). It seemed to work, but may also demolish Germans’ long-term trust in the single currency. Both events will transform Mrs Merkel’s chancellorship. (see article)

Some interesting charts and photos related to the topic:

Acropolis now?

The Greek debt crisis is spreading. Europe needs a bolder, broader solution—and quickly, says The Economist. Read full coverage of Greek crisis HERE. What I wanted to share  even more was the following photo that speaks for itself. I just love The Economist’s creativity:

“We give you cash, you give us Corfu!”

On Friday, Greece admitted it could no longer pay down its massive debts.  Athens is seeking the emergency loans before it must make additional payments on its debt next month.
The cost of insuring Greek government debt against default recently surpassed Ukraine to become the most expensive in Europe. On Monday, the spread hit another unwelcome milestone by widening at one point beyond 700 basis points (meaning it would cost $700,000 a year for five years to insure $10 million of government debt against default), making Greece more risky than Pakistan, noted Timothy Ash of Royal Bank of Scotland, in a research note. While that may seem extreme, Pakistan does have some advantages, Ash said in a tongue-in-cheek note to clients, including a debt-to-GDP ratio of 55%, roughly half that of Greece, and a 2009 budget defict of 4% of GDP, less than a third of Greece’s level. Pakistan managed to grow by around 3% in 2009, while Greece’s economy shrank by around 2% and shows little prospect for growth any time soon.

Picture: German magazine Focus showed the famous armless classical statue, now at the Louvre, raising her middle finger under the headline “Cheats in the euro family” – suggesting that Greece had deliberately misled EU peers to cheat its way into the eurozone.

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